Everything is Made of Math
Worlds within worlds


lifeunderthewaves:

Alien invasion by paolopribaz99 Jellyfish

mucholderthen:

THE LARVAE (AND ADULT FEMALE) OF THE TRILOBITE BEETLE

The trilobite [beetle] genus (Duliticola) belongs to the family Lycidae, commonly known as net-winged beetles.

This family is a pretty interesting one, because many of its species display huge physical differences between their males and their females. Trilobite beetles are no exception. While the females are easily recognisable – that incredible form is retained from when they were larvae [see Wikipedia neoteny] – the males look entirely different. They pretty much just look like plain old beetles, with long, winged bodies and a pair of thick antennae. 

Bec Crew, Scientific American

  1. Trilobite Beetle larva (Duliticola hoseini) by nickybay on Flickr.
  2. Trilobite Beetle by Kurt (orionmystery.blogspot.com) on Flickr.
  3. Trilobite Beetle larva (Duliticola sp.) by nickybay on Flickr.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Burrowing Parrot (Cyanoliseus patagonus)

Also known as the Patagonian Conure, the burrowing parrot is a species of Arine parrot (Arinae) which is typically found in Argentina but populations occur in Chile and possibly Uruguay as well. Burrowing parrots typically inhabit arid bush steppe areas known as Monte. Like some other parrot species burrowing parrots are highly gregarious and will form large colonies in cliff faces, thus the name “burrowing”. Burrowing parrots feed mainly on seeds and fruit but will feed on grain as well. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Psittaciformes-Psittacoidea-Psittacidae-Arinae-Arini-Cyanoliseus-C. patagonus

Images: Gerzo Gallardo and DickDaniels

xysciences:

A domino can knock over another domino 1.5x larger than itself.

The above Gif shows a domino 5 millimeters tall starting a chain reaction 13 dominos long that eventually knocks over a domino about half a meter tall.

If the reaction was 29 dominos long, the final domino would be the size of the Empire State Building.

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

for-science-sake:

A multitude of butterflies and their beautiful wings under the microscope. 

[Source]

colourofthepast:

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imposibleisposible:

llllllllllllllllllllllll5lllllllllllllllllllllllllll2321 | via Tumblr na We Heart It.